Wonder Woman #7 (1943)

Comic Book Elections: Is Hillary America’s Wonder Woman of tomorrow?

Comic Book Elections, Comics, Featured, Top story
Wonder Woman #7 (1943)
Wonder Woman #7 (1943)
-art by Harry G. Peter

Last Tuesday night was a historic moment for our country as former First-Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, became the first female nominee for president of the United States by a major political party. Of course Bernie Sanders supporters will remind us that she is the “presumptive nominee” and that this isn’t over yet; but the writing is on the wall.

Love or hate Mrs. Clinton, we should all applaud the fact that we’ve finally reached the point in our nation’s history where this achievement is possible. And comic book historians will note that we actually did it a full 984 years before it was predicted, way back in 1943’s Wonder Woman #7.

The creator of Wonder Woman, William Moulton Marston (writing as Charles Moulton), was one of the most progressive advocates of women’s rights and feminism in the 1940s – at least for a man of that era – and at the height of World War II, when this book was published, even he didn’t imagine we’d actually have a woman become president for another 1,000 years.

Wonder Woman #7 (1943)

For me, one of the biggest thrills in reading classic comics and old pulp sci-fi stories is seeing the future as envisioned through the eyes of the past; or, as Wonder Woman’s Mom, Queen Hippolyta, explains, “Tomorrow happened yesterday. Future Events already exist because they are created by past events.”

“… what I care about most is the history our country has yet to write.” – Hillary Clinton, June 7, 2016

Wonder Woman #7 (1943)In this important Golden Age issue of Wonder Woman, Diana Prince takes Thanksgiving leave from her job as a Department of Defense secretary to return home to Paradise Island. There the Queen uses the “Magic Sphere” to show her daughter visions of the future, where, in the year 3000, we have a woman President, Arda Moore, who is being threatened by a Senator Heeman, of the Man’s World party, who is demanding that their leader, Grafton Patronage, be released from federal prison. (You gotta love the innuendo in these character names.)

When Queen Hippolyta advances the Magic Sphere another four-years, to 3004, Diana (AKA Wonder Woman) herself is running for president, but has to combat a ballot manipulation ploy by Grafton Patronage and his unscrupulous stooges. Wonder Woman’s old pals, Steve Trevor and Etta Candy, are also along on this future adventure, thanks to the discovery of the L3 Life Vitamin – which has given them immortality.

Wonder Woman #7 (1943)Given the subject matter in this 73-year-old comic, another very weird item that struck me was an early panel where Diana is awakened by a phone call at 3:00 AM. This might remind you of a controversial ad that Hillary Clinton ran back in 2008, questioning Barack Obama’s experience, when her campaign asked the question, “Who do you want answering the phone?” Kind of a creepy coincidence, don’t you think?

Now whether William Moulton Marston could see into the future himself is up for debate, but you can’t argue the fact that his Senator Heeman pays a remarkable resemblance to a certain orange-skinned, bizarre-haired blowhard that has inundated our news the past several months.

Wonder Woman #7 (1943)Heeman claims, “You women are feather-brained idealists.” (Sound familiar?) He is “fed up with woman’s oppression” and he is demanding male rights. Among his grievances he believes that President Moore has “stopped men from making money out of public office,” and “taught people to elect officials who serve the public and expect nothing for themselves.”

Now if it’s going to take a woman to end the deep-rooted corruption in our government, then I’m all for it. Will “presumptive nominee” Clinton end up being the Wonder Woman we need and deserve? Where’s that magic sphere at…?

Wonder Woman #7 (1943)

RECOMMENDED READING: You can read the full issue of Wonder Woman #7 (1943) over at Comixology.com.

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